With the shape and size of the tree determined, you will begin by preparing a framework that defines the model you have in mind while considering things like balance, thickness of branches, taper, and the like.   With anchoring considered based on the size of the tree, you will set up your operating area.  After cutting, bending, shaping, and welding what will seem like a lot of ¼” steel rod, you will incorporate the internal plumbing followed by more of the previous.  Expandable foam locks in the tubing.  Carving away the foam defines the first look of the actual tree and helps to improve shape.  A mesh layer is firmly sewn on to accept the first fill layer of concrete followed by a texturing layer.  Painting gives depth to the bark and creates a sense of realism.  

Views: 470

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I'm really excited to learn more about this awesome art. I'm inspired by the pictures that are displayed . I hope I will be able to acquire an understanding with Mr. Senchuk guidance on how to develop this skill. I admire the elegance of this beautiful work

     Thank You So Much, for exposing us to another dimension of art work

Hi all..I am wanting to start working on making palm trees...I"m in the dark a little on how to proceed..how to make sure the wind doesn't blow the tree down (I live on the beach and everything is sand)..how to make the frame..what mix to use, etc.  Any advice?..where can I get the fronds?..fronds that won't fade in a year or two with the sun!!

Michael

Michael,  thanks for your interest.   I think you are going to be pleased with one of the three different anchoring systems I use for Living Tree Art.  It will work fine for your palm trees, even in sand.  Working as fast as I can on the instructions.  Hang in there.

Hello to All,

I am happy that I have  been accepted into this group.  I look forward to learning how to build a tree also.  I am in agreement with Michael in the question of anchoring systems.  I live in an area where the wind blows constantly.  Sometimes up to 70 mph on a stormy day.

Also interested in the fronds.

The manual covers two types of anchoring systems, both are excellent.

There are three types of anchoring systems discussed in the manual.   I refer to them as "Anchor Systems A, B, and C."  All of these issues are discussed with primary consideration being public safety.    Size matters when it comes to anchoring.    Just like a root system on a real tree, the anchoring can be developed to be buried wider and deeper relative to the conditions that apply to your tree.  Anchoring is dependent upon the winds in the area you live, the density and closeness of the plants you plan to use, size of the tree, and the type of soil into which your tree is anchored.  All three systems are interchangable to offer opportunity to go from an outdoor display in summer to indoor display in winter. 



Jynja Calderon said:

Hello to All,

I am happy that I have  been accepted into this group.  I look forward to learning how to build a tree also.  I am in agreement with Michael in the question of anchoring systems.  I live in an area where the wind blows constantly.  Sometimes up to 70 mph on a stormy day.

Also interested in the fronds.

Jynja,
The fronds I recommend can be any type of tropical or flowering plant that cascades over the sides of the pot sufficient to cover the pot.  The choices are limitless.  I recently sent a page of photos to Nathan showing all types of beautiful flower pots any one of which could be used to make a new species of Living Tree Art.  I'm sure he can include these into the manual in the part that discusses plant choices.  Placement of the tree is important.  The manual discusses all issues in regard to winds, soil types, and other concerns as well as how to deal with them.      Earl

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2020   Created by VerticalArtisans.com.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service